Numerous Amendments to Water By-laws

Numerous Amendments to Water By-laws

The City of Cape Town last month approved a number of amendments to the Water By-law. In addition to noting the amendments, the City encourages residents to familiarise themselves with what is required of them in terms of this legislation.

Read more below:

On 31 May 2018, Council voted to approve a number of proposed amendments to the Water By-law. These changes were aimed mainly at improving clarity, as well as preparing the City for a more water-scarce future.

Residents should please note that this amendment does not replace the Level 6 Water Restrictions. Rather, water restrictions are implemented in addition to this by-law, when necessary.

Changes most relevant to the general public include the following:

· Landlords must now keep record of consumption for each residential unit in a multi-tenant complex/block of flats, and inform the City if contraventions of water restrictions are taking place

· New developments must install water conservation and demand management systems, or alternative water systems, and these must be approved by the City before development proceeds

· The City’s oversight of plumbers has been strengthened by allowing the City to not only remove plumbers from its register but institute legal action if they are found to have transgressed the Water By-law

· Updates have been made to align the By-law with new legislation, standards and technical specifications.

· A prepayment meter is now an option, in addition to the WMD, as a Council water meter. While this technology is not yet at a stage of development for uptake by the City, having this item of legislation in the By-law allows the City to make use of it in the event that it becomes appropriate and necessary.

· Potable (drinking) water storage tanks must be impervious to sunlight to prevent the growth of bacteria

· No cross-connection must exist on private property between potable and non-potable water systems

· No irrigation of gardens is allowed between 09:00 and 18:00, including from boreholes and well-points. Previously no irrigation was allowed 10:00 and 16:00, and did not include borehole water. Watering gardens in the heat of the day can result in significant water lost to evaporation

· Maximum capacity for toilet cisterns and shower head flow has been lowered. Toilets are now only allowed a maximum 6 litre cistern volume (down from 9 litres), and water from shower heads must flow out at no more than 7 litres per minute (down from 9.5 litres/minute)

· All pools must be fitted with a cover to avoid evaporation when not in use

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Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Whether you’re after a windswept coastal wander, a mountainous hike with spectacular views, or a leisurely amble through one of the Cape’s lush nature reserves, here’s our pick of the best hiking trails in and around the city. So, lace up your hiking boots and get cracking… And, let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Important note:
Although the Cape is rich in natural beauty, tourists and locals are urged to take necessary precautions when exploring secluded areas, as crimes and accidents do happen.
Those venturing into the Table Mountain National Park should have the following emergency numbers on hand: 086 110 6417/ 107 or 021 480 7700. Criminal incidents should be reported to the nearest police station as soon as able.
We also recommend @safetymountain as a useful resource for hikers. This free safety tracking service allows you to notify local trackers of your contact details, intended route and travel time via whatsapp. You are then able to provide hourly updates on your progress, and to notify trackers when you are safely off the mountain.

It helps to have a map, and for that, SANParks and The Inside Guide recommends Slingsby Maps as an essential resource for hiking enthusiasts. Detailed maps of some of the Cape’s best hiking trails are available, including the Pipe Track, Cape Point and the Cederberg. Contact Slingsby Maps at 021 788 4545 for more information.

Hiking trails in Cape Town
Hiking trails around the Cape

Source:  https://insideguide.co.za/cape-town/hiking-trails/

This post brought to you by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Tribute to Mohammed Ockards

Tribute to Mohammed Ockards

This month, a true stalwart in the carting industry was lost. Mohammed Ockards, affectionately known as “Oom Gammat” passed away at the age of 72. It is truly the end of an era but not of his legacy.

When CHPA started 23 years ago, Oom Gammat was already a well-known and established figure within the industry. He was a born horseman and many of the Ockards’ children have it in their blood too. His father used to transport the midwife in District Six in a special cart which doubled as the hearse in the area. Oom Gammat himself used to have a fruit and veg stall and even drove early mornings all the way to Kalk Bay to fetch fish with which he traded.

 

The last 7 or 8 years he lived in Heinz Park and still took his grand daughter to school with his cart and horses. If he needed to go anywhere, the cart was his transport. He loved having horses in double harness and tried to match the colours of his pairs as much as he could. He had a real affection for donkeys and he and Sakkie (who lives at the R&R since he retired) made a mean team and were seen in many TV adverts. Oom Gammat himself also appeared on may TV inserts on programmes such as Carte Blanche when they were featuring programmes on the people who were displaced from District Six.

Diana Truter describes Oom Gammat as a  wise man with a wicked sense of humour. He always taught lessons through his stories and jokes, but one had to listen carefully because he loved telling tall tales as well. He had a good heart and apart from teaching Diana about horses when she first started with Cart Horse, was very involved in the education of not only other drivers in the carting industry, but also our Equine Welfare Practitioners.

Especially in the early days of Cart Horse, Oom Gammat was involved in our fundraising efforts and never said no when we asked to take his horses to an event. They always looked well with spotless harnesses and beautiful carts.

Oom Gammat will be fondly remembered by anyone who had anything to do with him but his legacy lives on in his children, most of whom still own horses and are prime examples of how horses should be looked after.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape town South

 

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

Distributed on behalf of David Pena, Valley North Neighbourhood Watch:

JOIN US FOR A MASS HIKE TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

Are you tired of the senseless violent attacks on the mountains and beaches?

Are you fed up with the criminals and perpetrators owning the mountains and beaches?

Are you tired of feeling unsafe and unable to even take a short walk into the mountains for fear of your and your family’s lives, thus being restricted to built up areas?

Do you feel for the victims and their families who have been devastated by the attacks?

We’re organising a hike up Elsie’s Peak next week Saturday 10 February, TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

The goal: To promote awareness, show solidarity for this common cause and show support for the victims of the recent attacks as well as their families.

To guarantee safety for you and your family there will be an armed response, neighbourhood watches present at the parking and on the route. SAPS will be informed of the event.

Table Mountain Security Action Group members will be present.

The established “Take Back Our Mountains” hiking group has been informed of and fully support this Elsies Peak Hike.

Bring the whole family, bring a smile and let’s enjoy the mountain the way that we are supposed to and is our right to!

We’re going to take back our mountains and beaches, one trail at a time!!

Let’s make it a big group, to make a proper statement and to break the shackles that have been placed on us!!!”

ALL WELCOME – PLEASE SHARE

When: Sat 10 Feb, 09:00

Where: Golconda Street, Glencairn Heights, Start of Elsies Peak trail.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Shoals of yellow tail in False Bay may attract great white sharks

Shoals of yellow tail in False Bay may attract great white sharks

From: City of Cape Town

13 November 2017

The first large shoals of yellow tail for the summer were spotted in False Bay over the weekend. The City of Cape Town wants to remind beach goers that the presence of great white sharks increases in in-shore areas with the arrival of yellow tail and higher water temperatures.

In-shore shark activity usually increases over the summer months, especially with the current yellow tail sightings.

‘Shark sightings typically start in late August, and continue through to April, with most sightings being reported mid-summer. With the school holidays around the corner and warmer days ahead, I want to urge Capetonians and visitors to please take extra care when going into the ocean. Shark spotters and the Fish Hoek exclusion net are important safety measures, but the best precaution is to be alert and aware when in the water,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.

As we are approaching mid-summer, the City appeals to all beach goers to familiarise themselves with the following safety tips:

  • Use beaches where shark spotters are on duty
  • Take the time to speak to the shark spotters on the day you visit the beach
  • Use the shark spotters signs to familiarise yourself with the four-flag warning system and warning siren – the green flag indicates that spotting conditions are good; the red flag indicates that there is a high risk of in-shore shark activity; the black flag means spotting conditions are poor; and the white flag with the black shark indicates a shark has been spotted (a siren will sound and all should leave the water immediately)
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski when birds, dolphins or seals are feeding nearby
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski where trek-netting, fishing or spear-fishing is taking place
  • Do not swim in deep water beyond the breakers
  • Do not swim if you are bleeding
  • Do not swim near river mouths
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski at night
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski if there has been a whale stranding nearby
  • Obey beach officials, lifeguards and shark spotters if told to leave the water
  • Be aware that the rate of encounters with white sharks rises significantly when the water temperature is warmer (18ºC or higher) and during new moon, due to increased opportunities for feeding
  • If a shark has recently been sighted in an area where no shark spotters are present, consider using another beach for the day
  • First-time visitors to beach areas should ask the local law enforcement official, lifeguards or locals about the area
  • For those people kayaking or surf-skiing far out to the sea, please consider paddling in groups and staying close together (in a diamond formation)
  • Consider using a personal shark shield when you go surfing or kayaking
  • Pay attention to any shark signage on beaches

Surfers must be especially vigilant in the areas between Sunrise Beach and the Macassar Beach during the spring and summer months, as research has shown that shark presence in these waters is extremely common at this time of year.

The Shark Spotters information centre at Muizenberg Surfers Corner is open to the public from 08:00 until 18:00 seven days a week. The centre provides up-to-date information on sharks and marine ecology, basic first-aid, general public assistance and help with emergencies, and storage of valuables and lost property.

Shark spotters are present at the following beaches:

Beach Summer (October-April) Winter
Muizenberg Surfers Corner Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
St James/Kalk Bay Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Fish Hoek Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:45
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Caves, Kogel Bay Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Noordhoek (The Hoek) Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
(September to May)
N/A
Cloverlly Weekends, public holidays and school holidays
08:00 – 18:00
N/A
Glencairn Weekends, public holidays and school holidays
08:00 – 18:00
N/A
Monwabisi Weekends, public holidays and school holidays
08:00 – 18:00
N/A

The Fish Hoek exclusion net has proven to be an effective shark safety measure by creating a physical barrier preventing any sharks from entering the bathing area. The exclusion net is in operation during the summer season as follows:

October 2017 School holidays and weekends
November 2017 – March 2018 The net will operate on a daily basis, depending on the weather. Weekends, public holidays and school holidays will be prioritized
April 2018 School holidays, public holidays and weekends

The exclusion net will not be deployed if weather conditions – wind and swell – are deemed unsuitable. Conditions are assessed on a daily basis. If weather conditions deteriorate after the net has been deployed already, the net may be removed as a precautionary measure. The net is not deployed when there is a high presence of whales or other marine mammals in the area.

On days that the exclusion net is deployed, the operating hours will be from 09:00 to 17:00. The operating hours may be extended to allow for lifesaving training or events. The Shark spotters will inform beach goers as and when the net is deployed via Twitter, Facebook, and the Shark Spotter mobile application (app).

Residents and visitors are urged to download the Shark Spotters mobile app to access the latest shark safety information, including what flag is flying at each beach, the latest shark sightings, net deployments, and much more. The app is available free of charge for Apple and Android devices and can be downloaded by searching for ‘Shark Spotters’ on the app store.

For more information on the latest shark sightings and research, please visit www.sharkspotters.org.za or follow the Shark Spotters on Twitter (@SharkSpotters) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/SharkSpotters).

‘We encourage the public to report sightings of white sharks to the Shark Spotters. White sharks are present in our waters all year round and beach goers should be aware that there is always a small possibility of encountering one of these animals. Please remain vigilant while enjoying the ocean,’ said Councillor Herron.

More Information

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Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

Wind, hot weather leads to decline in dam levels

From: City of Cape Town

Dam storage levels are at 36.8%, with useable water at 26.8%. Collective water usage is 582 million litres, therefore 82 million litres above the required level of 500 million litres per day.

Our dam levels have declined by 1% over the past week. This could be attributed to the high winds and hot weather which contributed to evaporation. We have managed to halve Cape Town’s water usage with the help of 51% of our water users who have put tremendous efforts into saving water. We will only get through this crisis together. To make this partnership work even more effectively, I appeal to all water users, especially the 49% who are not saving water yet, to join us all as we escalate efforts to beat this drought. Your help is vital and we need you to come on board with Team Cape Town.

This summer with the heat and wind, we can expect a steady decline going forward, so continued savings are a must. We need to do more to bring our usage down while at the same time pulling out all of the stops to ensure that we implement various projects for additional water supply to help see us through to winter 2018. Additional supply goes hand in hand with further savings.

We have looked at ways to fund a first phase of water supply projects by relooking at our spend across the City to see which non-water-related projects we can temporarily postpone while protecting funds for basic and emergency services. Internally, we have made some tough decisions and we will continue to do what is in the best interests of the people of Cape Town, no matter how difficult the challenge. We will partly be funding our first seven additional water projects with this saving and reprioritised money which comprises some R2 billion. The first phase projects earmarked for these funds are the desalination plants at Monwabisi, Strandfontein, the V&A Waterfront, and Cape Town Harbour; the Atlantis and Cape Flats Aquifer projects; and the Zandvliet water recycling project make up the first seven emergency water projects of this phase.

An online toolkit has been developed with various resources for all to use to help us to drive this message. Please see our website, www.capetown.gov.za, to access material that you may require. This toolkit will be updated regularly.

For information on how to meet the daily water usage requirement, residents should please visit the water restrictions page on the City’s website: www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater and utilise our water calculator: http://bit.ly/ThinkWaterCalculatorCT

Residents can contact the City via email to water@capetown.gov.za for queries about the water pressure reduction, or to report contraventions of the water restrictions (evidence should be provided to assist the City’s enforcement efforts), or they can send an SMS to 31373.
This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Southern Peninsula’s scenic Main Road open and ready for summer season

Southern Peninsula’s scenic Main Road open and ready for summer season

From: City of Cape Town

The multi-million rand rehabilitation of Main Road, one of the Southern Peninsula’s most scenic access routes, has been completed. With summer upon us, residents and visitors to the suburbs of Muizenberg, St James, and Kalk Bay can now fully enjoy the benefits of this project.

The City of Cape Town is wrapping up work on Main Road in the far south.

We completed the final asphalt surface of Main Road on Wednesday 1 November 2017. We will be done with minor snags by the end of this week which will have little, if any, impact on the traffic. This is a major accomplishment, not only for the City, but also for residents and business owners who patiently endured the roadworks, traffic disruptions, and stop/go systems while we were working on the most challenging phase of the project,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.

The City commenced with the first phase of the project – from Casa Labia in Muizenberg up to St James – in March 2008. Construction of Phase 2 – between Leighton Road in St James and the Kalk Bay Harbour entrance – started in January 2011 and was completed in August 2013.

‘We have nearly concluded this nine-year long project, with the overall investment amounting to approximately R340 million. The project took place over three phases and we are almost done with the third and final phase. Road users will still see some activity next to the road while we are sorting some minor finishing to the footways. We are also busy with the upgrade of the parking area at the Kalk Bay harbour which should be completed before the builders’ holiday.

‘The bulk of the R340 million was spent on the rehabilitation of the road base layers and surfacing of Main Road from the intersection with Atlantic Road in Muizenberg to the intersection with Clovelly Road; the construction of a new retaining wall at Clovelly; and replacing timeworn underground services such as the 100-year-old sewer pipes and 50-year-old water main at Clovelly. We also installed low-voltage electricity cables, new stormwater infrastructure and streetlights,’ said Councillor Herron.

The construction of a new retaining wall above the railway line in Clovelly posed the biggest challenge. Apart from making it possible to widen the road at this section, the retaining wall also serves as a support structure for Main Road. Thanks to the wider road, there is now parallel parking along the sea side and walkways on the mountain and sea side for pedestrians and cyclists all the way from Woolley’s Pool to the Silvermine River bridge.

‘We have used state-of-the-art technology to stabilise and compact the soil to ensure that it has sufficient bearing capacity for the foundations of the retaining wall. This technology saved us up to six months’ working time – an important factor for local residents and business owners, given the disruptions that were caused by the ongoing roadworks. The retaining wall has been fitted with a handrail, and we will soon install a glass barrier along a short section where Metrorail’s overhead electricity cables are in close proximity to the footway. These features were carefully chosen so that we do not impede the views of False Bay, Simon’s Town and Fish Hoek,’ said Councillor Herron.

The wall has been dressed with sandstone that was excavated from the site, and is buttressed at 5 m intervals to create shadow lines, adding to its aesthetics.

The revamping in 2015 of the historic mile area in Muizenberg, a surfing haven for locals and visitors, formed part of the project.

‘We refurbished walkways, parking areas and access routes. We paved the sidewalks with red bricks along the stretch of Main Road where it meanders under the colonnades of historic buildings dating from the late 1890s. The median island at the crossing of York and Main Roads was extended to make it safer for pedestrians crossing Main Road towards Muizenberg Park,’ said Councillor Herron.

A new grass-block public parking area with an additional 30 bays was added near the police station along School Road. Opposite the Muizenberg Station, an additional seven parking bays were created thanks to the new layout of the Bay Road steps, also built from sandstone to fit in with the character of the area.

‘We resurfaced the parking area opposite the False Bay College, replaced the streetlights with new pedestrian-friendly streetlights that are lower and provide better lighting at night, and installed sandstone benches in the communal area adjacent to the railway line where students and visitors can sit while enjoying the view over False Bay,’ said Councillor Herron.

The sidewalks along York Road were widened and brick-paved to protect the columns of the historic buildings along the short one-way street.

‘This was a unique project, given the existing roadway’s long history dating back to the 19th century when the alignment of Main Road was first formalised and road drainage installed after the rail line was constructed to Kalk Bay in 1882,’ said Councillor Herron.

The kerbs and channels, for example, are constructed from hand-hewn local sandstone. During the rehabilitation of this section of road, the stones were lifted, stored and reused in the vicinity where they were originally placed.

‘In fact, some of the stone kerbs and channels in the vicinity of the St James and Kalk Bay railway stations had not been touched for nearly 140 years – that is until we commenced with the rehabilitation project. As such, we took careful consideration of the history and heritage of this area during the design and subsequent rehabilitation works with the assistance of local residents and interest groups,’ said Councillor Herron.

The significance of this project is obvious given that Main Road is one of only three access routes to the far south and that it currently carries about 20 000 vehicles per day. Furthermore, the maintenance of existing infrastructure and assets counts among the key priorities in the City’s Organisational Development and Transformation Plan.

‘We estimate that the investment in Main Road will extend the life cycle of the road by at least another 20 years without the need for major maintenance. I once again want to thank all of those who were involved – from our residents, local business owners and interested groups, to the contractors and the officials – for their patience, hard work and contribution,’ said Councillor Herron.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

City commissions project to bring additional drinking water online from springs and Molteno Reservoir

City commissions project to bring additional drinking water online from springs and Molteno Reservoir

From: City of Cape Town

The first water from the Oranjezicht Main Springs Chamber started flowing into the Molteno Reservoir today, 8 November 2017. This is part of the City of Cape Town’s ongoing Water Resilience Programme to increase the supply of drinking water. This project will see an additional two million litres per day of safe, clean drinking water added to the City’s bulk water network.

Three springs feed into the main collection chamber in Oranjezicht, where water is collected before being conveyed via a 525m long existing pipeline to the reservoir. The water is then chlorinated to bring it in line with the South African National Standard for drinking water (SANS 241).

The project entailed refurbishing for drinking water purposes the existing but disused pipeline, which takes the water from natural springs to the Molteno Reservoir. New chlorination equipment to dose the disinfectant along the pipeline linking it to the reservoir itself has also been installed.

When the City started investigating the possibility of using these springs as additional sources of drinking water in 2014, our Scientific Services Branch found that water from some of the springs was of a very high quality.

Previously, this untreated water from the main springs collection chamber was used for irrigation at the Green Point Urban Park, Cape Town Stadium and Green Point Athletics track.

From the commencement of the City’s investigation to this point of commissioning, the cost of this project amounted to around R4,1 million.

The City is committed to doing everything it can to ensure that Cape Town has sufficient drinking water to see us through the upcoming summer months, and beyond.

Last week I also visited the Atlantis Aquifer where refurbishment work by the City’s Water and Sanitation Management Department has increased yield from this source by an additional five million litres a day.

We will continue working on a range of augmentation plans, fast-tracking processes as much as possible to bring alternative sources of drinking water online, including desalination, ground water extraction, and water reuse as we build a water-resilient Cape Town. Together with the great water-saving efforts of residents, we will make it through this unprecedented drought.

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Notice of Annual General Meeting

Notice of Annual General Meeting

REMINDER!

This is a notice that the Kalk Bay and St James SRA NPC will hold its Annual General Meeting (AGM) on the following date and ime:

Date:    TUESDAY 7 November 2017

Time:   20h00

Venue: Community Centre, Main Road, Kalk Bay

 

Any member may appoint a proxy to attend the AGM and vote on his/her behalf. In the event that a property owner is unable to attend the AGM, kindly complete the proxy form available on www.kalkbaystjamessra.org or at the SRA office which needs to be returned to the SRA, either as an attachment to an e-mail or by delivery to the SRA office, no later than 24 hours before the AGM.

KBSJ SRA Management Team

Address

Kalk Bay Community Centre

Main Road

Kalk Bay

7975

More Information

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Mayor De Lille visits desalination plant site at V&A Waterfront

Mayor De Lille visits desalination plant site at V&A Waterfront

Today I visited the site of one of the City of Cape Town’s modular land-based desalination plants. The plant will produce 2 million litres of water per day and this water will be fed into the City’s water distribution network by February 2018.

Last week I made a commitment to communicate directly with all Capetonians about the City’s work to secure alternative water sources.  My message is clear: we have a plan, we will supply water but Capetonians, your help is vital and so we need you to keep saving.  I want to thank and commend Capetonians for their great efforts and for being partners on this journey by saving water.  We managed to bring consumption down to 585 million litres of collective use per day from pre-restriction consumption levels of 1,1 billion litres per day.

We will not allow a well-run city to run out of water.

The City is securing our water resilience through saving and bringing more alternative water sources into our network.  One such water source is the temporary desalination plant the City is building on East Pier Road in the V&A Waterfront.  An open-air parking lot opposite the heliports will be converted into a desalination plant that will produce 2 million litres of water every day.  The V&A Waterfront made the land available to the City at no cost. This is a good example how government and business can work together to ensure our water resilience.  Water will be abstracted from the ocean on the harbour side of the pier, treated at the desalination plant and treated clean water will be pumped into the City’s water network near the site.  The location of the site makes it easy for the City to provide services to the desalination plant. The City will provide electricity in November 2017 and construction will start soon after.

The desalination plant is in addition to the eight other modular land-based desalination plants the City is implementing.

These are for the following sites:

  • Hout Bay – to produce 4 million litres per day
  • Granger Bay – to produce 8 million litres of water per day
  • Red Hill/Dido Valley – to produce 2 million litres of water per day
  • Strandfontein – to produce 7 million litres per day
  • Monwabisi – to produce 7 million litres per day
  • Harmony Park – to produce 8 million litres per day
  • Cape Town Harbour – to produce 50 million litres per day
  • The universal sites – to produce 20 million litres per day

On Friday the City awarded the tenders to the desalination plants at Strandfontein and Monwabisi.  The City is also working on groundwater abstraction at Atlantis and Silwerstroom, Cape Flats Aquifer, Cape Peninsula and Hottentots-Holland aquifers.  The City has already managed to increase the production capacity of the existing Atlantis and Silwerstroom aquifer by 5 million litres per day. This will increase incrementally to 25 million litres per day.  At the Zandvliet Wastewater Treatment Works, the pipeline work has already started and the yield will rise incrementally from this source to produce 10 million litres per day.  I am continually assessing the City’s solutions to provide alternative water sources while Capetonians continue to save.

We are not only building water resilience in the immediate future, but also looking ahead to the years to come and how we ensure water security beyond 2018.

Issued by: Media Office, City of Cape Town

Media enquiries: Xolani Koyana, Spokesperson for the Executive Mayor – Patricia de Lille, City of Cape Town, Tel: 021 400 5007 or Cell: 071 740 2219, Email: xolani.koyana@capetown.gov.za 


This important communication is shared via eNeighbourhoods Community Blogs
in a post sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South