Crime Stats for Your Hood!

Crime Stats for Your Hood!

Crime Stats South Africa displays the latest and historic South African crime statistics in an easy-to-understand format. You don’t need to know anything about police precincts or provincial boundaries. You can search, by address, for your area on a map of South Africa and immediately access the information you need.

We have created this analytical application to be used as a guideline for the reported crimes in South Africa. This should in no way influence opinions on the purchase of a new home, the management of a business or other such matters. The SAPS release the latest crime statistics annually.

Crime Stats SA is the initiative of Meerkat Data Management our online data capture and reporting system. It means that any of our users are able to securely access the system and use it from any place on the planet where an Internet connection is available. No special software is required on any of your PCs – the system operates through any of the standard Internet web browsers.

The Heatmap displays all the precincts in South Africa to you. Each precinct is colour coded.

  • The number of total crimes for the category or categories you have chosen are sorted numerically and then divided into 5 blocks, called quintiles.
  • The first quintile contains the precincts in the bottom 20%, so they have the least crimes. They are shown in green.
  • The fifth quintile contains the precincts that have are in the top 20% in terms of number of crimes, in other words they have the most crimes. They are shown in red.
  • Therefore the colour of the precinct, from green to orange to red, indicates how many crimes it has in comparison to the others.
  • In the advanced Search you can drill down to the area and crime types.

Click here to view the worst ten precincts :  largest number of reported crimes in Western Cape

This content curated for Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Don’t Assume a False Alarm!

Don’t Assume a False Alarm!

Has your household got a common understanding of what should actually happen when the alarm goes off?  This morning we had another false alarm, and yes most times they are!  Being a house where we have a few people at home most of the time, I considered this morning’s casual response as the alarm was switched off and how everyone just carried on about their business. Sooner or later we could pay a high price for that casual response of annoyance and irritation.

Do you have an agreed ALARM PROCEDURE that everyone in your household follows?  Well I decided we need one and I am sharing ours.  I have stuck it next to the alarm panel.

The alarm must automatically be treated as a SERIOUS MATTER and the following rules are to be followed:

1)  Do not go outside to investigate alone!

2) Lock all doors and close all windows immediately!  First close the doors and then close then windows INCLUDING the bathroom window and kitchen windows (ALL windows).

3)  If I am not at home you need to observe from inside of the house and consider some good vantage spots where you can look out.

4)  Do NOT turn off the alarm too soon and only turn off the alarm after doors and windows have been closed – the alarm will encourage an intruder to go not hand around but if you turn it off too soon it encourages them to stay!  Reset the alarm immediately.

5)  Only reopen doors and windows when it is obvious all is ok.  If I am not at home then observe for at least 30 minutes before opening up windows and doors.

6)  If anyone is observed then phone the emergency number 10111 and speak clearly telling them we have an intruder and the address – speak clearly and slowly.

7)  Move out of less secure rooms (like a sunroom) into more secure rooms!  It is generally considered best that the intruder sees people are at home and be seen speaking on the phone so he knows he has been seen and is being reported.  Even if you have finished speaking keep “talking” on the phone so he thinks you are giving information!  This will increase the chance of the intruder LEAVING.

8)  It is probably better to open gates from inside the house (if you have remotes) so the intruder can get away and help can get inside.

9) Make sure everyone knows where torches and other security devices are kept IN ONE ACCESSIBLE PLACE.

Keep emergency numbers somewhere they are not moved! On the fridge or next to the phone and include other numbers you can also call such as neighbours!

Personalise these notes for your property and family and share extra comments and advice.

Be prepared and stay safe.

This original article is shared with you by Andre de Villiers –  Chas Everitt Cape Town South

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

TAKE OUR MOUNTAINS BACK

Distributed on behalf of David Pena, Valley North Neighbourhood Watch:

JOIN US FOR A MASS HIKE TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

Are you tired of the senseless violent attacks on the mountains and beaches?

Are you fed up with the criminals and perpetrators owning the mountains and beaches?

Are you tired of feeling unsafe and unable to even take a short walk into the mountains for fear of your and your family’s lives, thus being restricted to built up areas?

Do you feel for the victims and their families who have been devastated by the attacks?

We’re organising a hike up Elsie’s Peak next week Saturday 10 February, TO TAKE BACK OUR MOUNTAIN!

The goal: To promote awareness, show solidarity for this common cause and show support for the victims of the recent attacks as well as their families.

To guarantee safety for you and your family there will be an armed response, neighbourhood watches present at the parking and on the route. SAPS will be informed of the event.

Table Mountain Security Action Group members will be present.

The established “Take Back Our Mountains” hiking group has been informed of and fully support this Elsies Peak Hike.

Bring the whole family, bring a smile and let’s enjoy the mountain the way that we are supposed to and is our right to!

We’re going to take back our mountains and beaches, one trail at a time!!

Let’s make it a big group, to make a proper statement and to break the shackles that have been placed on us!!!”

ALL WELCOME – PLEASE SHARE

When: Sat 10 Feb, 09:00

Where: Golconda Street, Glencairn Heights, Start of Elsies Peak trail.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Shoals of yellow tail in False Bay may attract great white sharks

Shoals of yellow tail in False Bay may attract great white sharks

From: City of Cape Town

13 November 2017

The first large shoals of yellow tail for the summer were spotted in False Bay over the weekend. The City of Cape Town wants to remind beach goers that the presence of great white sharks increases in in-shore areas with the arrival of yellow tail and higher water temperatures.

In-shore shark activity usually increases over the summer months, especially with the current yellow tail sightings.

‘Shark sightings typically start in late August, and continue through to April, with most sightings being reported mid-summer. With the school holidays around the corner and warmer days ahead, I want to urge Capetonians and visitors to please take extra care when going into the ocean. Shark spotters and the Fish Hoek exclusion net are important safety measures, but the best precaution is to be alert and aware when in the water,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.

As we are approaching mid-summer, the City appeals to all beach goers to familiarise themselves with the following safety tips:

  • Use beaches where shark spotters are on duty
  • Take the time to speak to the shark spotters on the day you visit the beach
  • Use the shark spotters signs to familiarise yourself with the four-flag warning system and warning siren – the green flag indicates that spotting conditions are good; the red flag indicates that there is a high risk of in-shore shark activity; the black flag means spotting conditions are poor; and the white flag with the black shark indicates a shark has been spotted (a siren will sound and all should leave the water immediately)
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski when birds, dolphins or seals are feeding nearby
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski where trek-netting, fishing or spear-fishing is taking place
  • Do not swim in deep water beyond the breakers
  • Do not swim if you are bleeding
  • Do not swim near river mouths
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski at night
  • Do not swim, surf or surf-ski if there has been a whale stranding nearby
  • Obey beach officials, lifeguards and shark spotters if told to leave the water
  • Be aware that the rate of encounters with white sharks rises significantly when the water temperature is warmer (18ºC or higher) and during new moon, due to increased opportunities for feeding
  • If a shark has recently been sighted in an area where no shark spotters are present, consider using another beach for the day
  • First-time visitors to beach areas should ask the local law enforcement official, lifeguards or locals about the area
  • For those people kayaking or surf-skiing far out to the sea, please consider paddling in groups and staying close together (in a diamond formation)
  • Consider using a personal shark shield when you go surfing or kayaking
  • Pay attention to any shark signage on beaches

Surfers must be especially vigilant in the areas between Sunrise Beach and the Macassar Beach during the spring and summer months, as research has shown that shark presence in these waters is extremely common at this time of year.

The Shark Spotters information centre at Muizenberg Surfers Corner is open to the public from 08:00 until 18:00 seven days a week. The centre provides up-to-date information on sharks and marine ecology, basic first-aid, general public assistance and help with emergencies, and storage of valuables and lost property.

Shark spotters are present at the following beaches:

Beach Summer (October-April) Winter
Muizenberg Surfers Corner Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
St James/Kalk Bay Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Fish Hoek Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:45
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Caves, Kogel Bay Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
Noordhoek (The Hoek) Monday- Sunday
08:00 – 18:00
(September to May)
N/A
Cloverlly Weekends, public holidays and school holidays
08:00 – 18:00
N/A
Glencairn Weekends, public holidays and school holidays
08:00 – 18:00
N/A
Monwabisi Weekends, public holidays and school holidays
08:00 – 18:00
N/A

The Fish Hoek exclusion net has proven to be an effective shark safety measure by creating a physical barrier preventing any sharks from entering the bathing area. The exclusion net is in operation during the summer season as follows:

October 2017 School holidays and weekends
November 2017 – March 2018 The net will operate on a daily basis, depending on the weather. Weekends, public holidays and school holidays will be prioritized
April 2018 School holidays, public holidays and weekends

The exclusion net will not be deployed if weather conditions – wind and swell – are deemed unsuitable. Conditions are assessed on a daily basis. If weather conditions deteriorate after the net has been deployed already, the net may be removed as a precautionary measure. The net is not deployed when there is a high presence of whales or other marine mammals in the area.

On days that the exclusion net is deployed, the operating hours will be from 09:00 to 17:00. The operating hours may be extended to allow for lifesaving training or events. The Shark spotters will inform beach goers as and when the net is deployed via Twitter, Facebook, and the Shark Spotter mobile application (app).

Residents and visitors are urged to download the Shark Spotters mobile app to access the latest shark safety information, including what flag is flying at each beach, the latest shark sightings, net deployments, and much more. The app is available free of charge for Apple and Android devices and can be downloaded by searching for ‘Shark Spotters’ on the app store.

For more information on the latest shark sightings and research, please visit www.sharkspotters.org.za or follow the Shark Spotters on Twitter (@SharkSpotters) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/SharkSpotters).

‘We encourage the public to report sightings of white sharks to the Shark Spotters. White sharks are present in our waters all year round and beach goers should be aware that there is always a small possibility of encountering one of these animals. Please remain vigilant while enjoying the ocean,’ said Councillor Herron.

More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Do you live in a Burglary Hot Spot or a Suburb Safe Zone?

neighbourhood“If property owners do not take collective action as a neighbourhood community, the affect on everyone’s property values in that neighbourhood could be very negative”, says Cape Town real estate broker, Andre de Villiers from Cape Town.

De Villiers was previously a Neighbourhood Watch Chairperson for a popular Cape Town coastal suburb. “My experience is that there are far too few residents prepared to get involved in neighbourhood security unless there is a dramatic spike in crime or a violent attack. The majority of residents it seems are only too happy to leave the collective security concerns to someone else”.

“As the owner of four real estate offices in Cape Town, I can confirm that buyers are increasingly asking agents for more details about security issues in the neighbourhood of the house they are interested in. The focus on the individual house’s security is correctly seen as something that can be resolved by the buyer, but the area’s reputation and crime statistics are a greater concern, as a buyer knows this will probably be an issue that falls outside their immediate control.”

There is certainly a demand for reliable data but this is not as easy to obtain as some may think. Many smaller incidents are not reported to the police and many private security services treat their information as confidential and many neighbourhood watch groups are understandably concerned that their neighbourhood could suffer if their efficiency in keeping records resulted in a negative message!

“I think any professional estate agent should have some reasonable methodology to answer security questions from buyers objectively about the neighbourhood. We can’t put our head in the sand over this issue and a lack of access to reliable data is certainly a challenge,” said de Villiers.

The message to property owners is to ‘buy in’ to the responsibility of keeping their neighbourhood safe and crime free through collective action, and thereby collecting a ‘collective security dividend’. “Imagine if you will, a pocket of houses that is able to claim and where the seller or agent can statistically show, that the subject area is the safest area in this suburb! If that’s not a great selling feature then, as a real estate professional with over thirty years experience, I am not sure what is!” said de Villiers.

Beware of Fraud in the Rental Market

Beware of Fraud in the Rental Market

crossed-fingers-at-handshakeThe public is urged to be aware of a bogus rental scheme that is taking place around the country.

This seems to work so well it has been gaining popularity!  Individuals pretend to be estate agents and target unsuspecting potential renters. They post details of rental properties online and then ask interested parties to secure the flat by paying a deposit, either in cash or via electronic funds transfer.
 
A Sea Point man was arrested in August on fraud charges after allegedly conning nine people after an advert on Gumtree.
 
The suspect reportedly advertised a flat for rent and then asked interested parties to secure the flat by paying a deposit and the first months rent, which in itself is normal terms and conditions. However, when it came time to move in, victims find the flat is occupied and the suspect has made off with the deposit.
 
These bogus agents inform potential renters that a number of people are interested in the property and are urged to view and pay the deposit and / or first months rent and they would get the property. With a tremendous scarcity it seems there are plenty of desperate tenants who fall for this.
 
Should tenants have an interest in a property it is recommend that you phone the local office of the estate agency to establish that the agent is a registered agent with that company. But of course it is easy to use the name of a real agent so do not just use the number you are given but look it up yourself.
 

Never transfer money without seeing a contract first or without verifying that you are dealing with the owner or the owner’s representative. Do not pay a deposit without solid confirmation that the organisation is following legal procedures. Easier said than done if you are desperate to secure the apartment.

Crime Stop

Crime Stop

quoteSouth Africa’s trusted tip-off service since 1992.
In two decades the anonymity of not even one informer has been compromised. We all have a responsibility to make South Africa safer for our children and every law-abiding citizen.

If you have information that can assist in exposing people involved in illegal activities, please contact us anonymously when you know:

WHO DID WHAT TO WHOM, WHEN, WHERE, WHY AND HOW?

Remember, the detectives are keen to follow up your information. Please give as many details as possible.